Tag: Home

Cranberry Breakfast Cookies – Diet Recipes: Healthy Home Cooking, Low-Calorie Lifestyle

Cranberry Breakfast Cookies – Diet Recipes: Healthy Home Cooking, Low-Calorie Lifestyle



Dr. Collins preparing simple and tasty foods which are low-calorie, low-carb, high-protein, diet eating options.
Cranberry Breakfast Cookies – Calories 156 – Full Recipe at www.DietHobby.com, which is a lifestyle guide to weight-loss and maintenance.


Best Under-$20 Zara Home Gems to Make Your Place Feel So Put Together

When it comes to budget shopping, I’d like to think of myself as something of an expert. I adore thrift stores and flea markets, and wandering through a HomeGoods sparks immeasurable joy. I regularly peruse H&M’s online home section, and I’m no stranger to the joys of Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist.

So, when I stumbled upon a Zara Home store in Spain a few summers ago, my mind was blown. As someone familiar with the fast fashion brand, I was shocked I didn’t know it had an entire home line. Like Zara’s clothing offerings, the decor and furniture collections are reasonably priced and speak to current trends.

Though my apartment is pretty much done and furnished, I’m always looking for new pieces to make my space stand out. From bathroom essentials to decorative items, here are eight of Zara Home’s best pieces—and they’re each less than $20.

Marbled paper napkins ($4.90)

Elevate your next cocktail hour, dinner party, or pizza night with these chic marbled napkins. And leave the extras on your bar cart for a little somethin’ extra.

Fossil print door knob (two-pack for $7.90)

It doesn’t take much time or effort to give tired cabinet or drawer fronts a quick upgrade. Turn your IKEA dresser into a masterpiece with a handful of these gold and ceramic door knobs. Or hammer a few into a wall as coat hooks.

Photo by Zara Home

Frame with stand (from $14.90)

These minimal picture frames are a dream for any decor personality (the small one is just the perfect size for my desk).

Geometric print pillowcase (from $14.90)

Give your throw pillows or bed pillows a facelift with these modern pillowcases. The side-tie closures make them a standout.

Gold candlestick ($14.90)

Whether you want a set of these for your next dinner party or just want to jazz up your mantel, this fluted glass candlestick is a gilded dream.

Glass dispenser ($14.90)

An instant bathroom upgrade for $15? I’m sold. Fill this glass dispenser up with your favorite liquid soap (the Food52 team is partial to this stuff.

Lemon ashtray ($17.90)

I don’t smoke, but this is one of the loveliest zinc trinket dishes I’ve ever seen. Use it to hold earrings and rings in your bedroom, or fill it with mixed nuts, dipping sauces, or lemon wedges (for a little lemon inception!) the next time you hold a food-fueled get-together.

Photo by Zara Home

Stars shower curtain ($17.90)

When’s the last time you thought about your shower curtain? Thought so. Transform every shower into a celestial experience with this subtly starry shower curtain (rings included).


Which of these picks are most drawn to? Let us know below!

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My Life at Home with Linda Derschang, Seattle Restaurateur

Welcome to My Life at Home, where we slow down for just a minute to share a glimpse into the lives of food lovers we’d love to get to know better. Kick off your shoes and get comfy!


Running a restaurant takes serious work. Running restaurants plural takes guts and a good dose of secret sauce. There’s a reason why certain places make it, and if you’re lucky, certain places are good at reproducing their vibe in a successful cadre of subsequent venues. This is what Linda Derschang of The Derschang Group has been doing—with gusto—over the past 25-plus years.

The veteran restaurateur has made her mark on Seattle’s dining scene since 1994, when she opened her first bar, Linda’s Tavern with Sub-Pop Records, the label that made it with Nirvana (R.I.P. Kurt Cobain). Since then, she’s put her Midas Touch on numerous bars and restaurants, including Oddfellows Café, Smith, Tallulah’s, King’s Hardware, and most recently, Queen City. I have yet to make it to the Emerald City, but I already feel a kinship with Linda’s portfolio of popular haunts. The menus, the style (which you’ll soon see is an extension of her very cool, individual taste)—you just know a place is good when it gives you those warm and inviting, where-everybody-knows-your-name Cheers-y vibes.

I recently had the chance to bend Linda’s ear and ask the busy boss lady—who’s called Seattle home since 1987—about her condo-home life (when she can fit it in!) in the Belltown neighborhood, and the challenges of staying relevant in such a competitive industry over the years. Read along—and be prepared for some next-level Westie cuteness.

HANA ASBRINK: Hi, Linda. How long have you lived in your current home and what do you love most about it?

LINDA DERSCHANG: I’ve lived in my condo for two years. I love the convenience of being right in the city, and having beautiful views and a terrace.

Linda’s great eye for design on display in her Seattle condo.

Photo by Catherine Landers

HA: Describe your decorating style for us. Who are your design influences?

LD: I always want to achieve a combination of style and comfort. I’m mainly influenced by travel, but also books and magazines, and I can certainly go down the Instagram rabbit hole.

There’s not one main designer who has influenced me. I pick up inspiration and ideas here and there. The Eames Lounge Chair is the best reading chair, hands down. I had wanted one for years, but moving into the condo meant I had the perfect place for it. I decided to buy a new one instead of vintage so that I could wear it in myself. I’m planning on reading in it for the next 20 years—or more, if I’m lucky.

The Eames Lounge Chair sitting pretty in front of a wall of ready-to-read books.

Photo by Catherine Landers

HA: What are your favorite home retailers?

LD: I love ABC Carpet & Home in New York City. I shop at vintage stores around Seattle, and I buy from Design Within Reach and a bit of IKEA. I also thrift and hit flea markets.

Midcentury homage with a tulip dining table and vintage Marcel Breuer Cesca chairs.

Photo by Catherine Landers

HA: If your walls could talk, what would they say?

LD: “She baby talks to her dog WAY too much.” Ha, the joys of living alone.

HA: Tell us more about your beautiful Westie. How does he make himself at home?

LD: My Westie is named Jack. He’s 11 and really just the best dog ever. Well, most of the time—he’s a terrier, after all. He makes himself at home on every cushion in the house, on the bed, and on both sofas. He also loves hanging out on the terrace watching birds. And he brings in The New York Times most days (not the Sunday edition, of course).

HA: Where could we find you on any given weeknight?

LD: I’m out quite a bit. You could find me at one of my spots checking in and meeting friends, especially at my newest place, Queen City. I also know a lot of people in the creative world, including artists, so I go to a lot of openings and dance performances. I also love lectures, book readings, and band performances.

HA: How often are you able to spend time at home?

LD: I spend a couple of nights a week at home. Honestly, if I was at home for four nights in a row, I’d probably have to be ill.

HA: Do you have a signature drink or dinner-party fare?

LD: It depends on the time of year, but in the summer I love to serve Aperol Spritzes and rosé; a watermelon, feta, and dry-cured olive salad with cold roast chicken; and Frankie & Jo’s ice cream. It’s simple, healthy, and delicious.

I’m also big on having friends come over and cook at my house. I love prepping the house for parties, and if I’m not cooking, I can just take care of the music and make sure everyone is having fun. (And most of my friends are much better cooks than I am anyway.)

Linda’s home: ready to serve friends at a moment’s notice.

Photo by Catherine Landers

HA: What is your ultimate comfort food?

LD: A cheeseburger.

HA: What do you always keep in your fridge?

LD: Wine, hummus, corn tortillas, sauerkraut, some sort of greens, and cheese.

Open sesame.

Photo by Catherine Landers

HA: What is your favorite way to relax after a long week?

LD: Hanging out on the sofa with my dog, a glass of wine, Lay’s potato chips, and a book or The New Yorker. Or dinner out with friends! It could go either way.

HA: What is the biggest joy and challenge of running your own business?

LD: The biggest joy is all about the people—both the guests and my team. I’ve met so many amazing people over the years. And I also love the freedom of being an owner, but that does mean there’s a lot of responsibility, obviously.

Staying relevant is a big challenge in the bar and restaurant business. There are always new places opening, which means we really need to do our best to keep people coming back. And having the right team is so important and critical to creating the right kind of culture.

HA: How has this changed over time, specifically in the recent handful of years?

LD: Because I’ve been doing this for more than three decades, I’m trying to be less hands-on. It’s hard to let go of some of the control, but you have to build a team you can trust.

HA: What’s on your playlist right now?

LD: Father John Misty, Nina Simone, Francois Hardy, Solange, Belle & Sebastian, The Specials, Nick Cave, a little classical, and some Indian devotional music.

HA: What are your favorite Food52 recipes?

LD: The Warm Squash and Chickpea Salad with Tahini is a favorite. Also the Charred Broccoli and Lentil Salad. There really are so many great salad recipes I’ve used from Food52.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.


What part of Linda’s home draws you in the most? Let us know below!

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Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

The wall of energy bars being sold in just about every grocery store is pretty astonishing. The problem I have with a lot of them is their highly processed ingredient lists. Also, the ones that have short, recognizable ingredient lists, often have a damp, strange texture – seemingly dates smashed with other stuff into an unappetizing looking log. These homemade energy bars aren’t as convenient, but they’re arguably much better. Here are some favorites – a mix of baked, no-bake, a range of simple to more elaborate.

1. Savory DIY Power Bars – (101 Cookbooks)

Before we dive into slightly sweeter versions of homemade power bars – have a look at these. If you can imagine sort-of savory Rice Crispy treats made with crumbled kale chips, toasted walnuts, and black olives, that’s the ballpark. Also, cut into tiny bit-sized squares, these make a cool addition to an appetizer spread. Get the recipe here.

Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

2. Mint Chocolate Power Bars – (Green Kitchen Stories)

Chocolate + mint + seeds + oats. These date-based bars are A+ awesome. Get the recipe here.

Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

3. 4 o’clock No-Bake Energy Bites – (QUITOKEETO)

These got me through many afternoon slumps over at our studio. I like the ratio of oats to nut butter here, and the addition of chia seeds. Plus they’re no-bake, delicious, and people loooove them. Use any nut butter you have on hand. Get the recipe here.

Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

4. Peanut Butter Goji Berry Granola Bars – (Love & Lemons)

Another tasty, crisped rice-based bar from L&L. Packed with goji berries, chia seeds, pistachios, pepitas, some chocolate for the win… Get the recipe here.

Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

5. Matcha Green Granola Bars – (My New Roots)

Matcha boosted, and packed with oats, seeds, and dried fruit. Love this take. Get the recipe here.

Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

6. DIY Snack Bars – (Cooking Light)

Some great ideas in this round-up at Cooking Light (beautifully photographed by Jen Causey)…there are some strange variations on the list, and a lot are too sweet for my tastes, but there are some interesting ideas, and looking through them inspires some ideas about all the different ways you can approach your won bars at home. Get the recipe here.

Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

7. Hazelnut Buckwheat Granola Bars – (Petit World Kitchen)

Love the banana factor in these. And how you can bake them super golden, so the oats get super toasty…. Get the recipe here.

Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

8. Cranberry Walnut Energy Bars – (Food & Wine)

These are old-school. From Super Natural Cooking, and published on in Food & Wine roughly ten years ago, but still a keeper. Play around with the fruit, nuts, and seeds you put in here, its a good base recipe… Get the recipe here.

Eight Energy Bars worth Making at Home

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FRIED POTATO BALLS – Easy Food Recipes For Dinner to make at home – cooking for begginers

FRIED POTATO BALLS – Easy Food Recipes For Dinner to make at home – cooking for begginers



written http://goo.gl/Ahcquu
how to make recipes cooking for dinner. simple tasty and quick Meals dishes. Fried crispy balls of potato. I remember when I was a kid, my mother brought me from the market, small potatoballs like these, but frozen. Here, you have a homemade potatoes balls. They are very easy to make.

Song: “The Builder”
Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

TAGS
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Home Plate/ Professional Sports and Mamma’s Food – (Show Concept Presentation)

Home Plate/ Professional Sports and Mamma’s Food – (Show Concept Presentation)



Show Concept, Athletes and possible Hosts :

Tag Line: Home Plate: 60 minute Celebrity Athlete with mom Cooking competition. We will take a heaping portion of Sports, a dash of Food and a pinch of Competition with the end result being a dish of Drama. Bon appetite!

Synopsis: Many professional celebrities feel their career is all owed to their moms…. “If it was not for my mom dragging me to basketball practice, I might have ended up on the track team…” Home Plate is a show where the athlete can show appreciation and love for their moms…The athletes will want to earn the bragging rights that their mom is the “best cook.” Food is more than just sight, taste, touch – it becomes cerebral. From one bite, we are whisked back in time to when skinned knees were as commonplace as a worm in hand; a time when Mom knew how to make everything better. Your team just lost its last game of the season and your little legs ran home in the cold chill of fall. Not even the distant ring of sleigh bells could abate your tears. Then, mom brings over a bowl of her homemade chili topped with freshly shredded cheese and a dollop of sour cream… A smile, a hug and a cup of hot cocoa topped with one huge marshmallow to complete the package. Somehow, tomorrow doesn’t seem as bad and the game that had defined your whole life, were just kids playing outside. Home Plate is a show where you the athlete can show appreciation and love for your mom… the athlete can earn the bragging rights that his mom’s recipes are the “best.” We will show–glimpse–into this superstar athlete’s life, both the past and present day.


Room Recipes: Entryway

Room Recipes: Entryway



Read the full post here:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/room-recipe-entryway-glidden-paint-220883


Room Recipes: Dining Room

Room Recipes: Dining Room



Read the full post here:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/room-recipe-dining-room-glidden-paint-220884


Instant Pot Mujadara | Feasting At Home

Instant Pot Mujadara – a nourishing vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Moroccan spices, served with caramelized shallots, seasonal veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. Fast and easy!

Instant Pot Mujadara - a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Middle Eastern spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. 

While in Morocco last winter, we hired a guide to take us up into the Atlas Mountains to visit the beautiful old Berber villages. Our guide, Rachid was not eating meat during this time and would often stop at roadside cafes for a quick bowl of Mujadara- a humble, nourishing meal of lentils and rice, seasoned with flavorful Moroccan Spices.  He described it as Moroccan comfort food – filling, nourishing and affordable.

This meal was very similar to what my Egyptian father used to make, but he called it “Kushari”. He would tell me stories of growing up in his tiny village, and how my grandmother, Shahada, a Copt, (old Christian religion) would make lentils and rice for them during their fasting time during the spring, thhe “Holy Great Fast” lasting almost two months. To my dad,  this became his comfort food and his version was very simply seasoned. Now that I think about it, this is actually very similar to Khichari, the healing Indian Ayurvedic Bowl I posted about a few years back. It seems many regions of the world have a version of this!

The Mujadara we experienced in Morocco was different from my father’s – it was flavored with fragrant Moroccan spices and this recipe here is inspired by the Moroccan version.

Instant Pot Mujadara - a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Middle Eastern spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. #mujadara #healthy #lentils #rice #instantpot #instapot #mujadararecipe

This Mujadara recipe can be made quickly and easily in an Instant Pot.

I thought my husband Brian would shun the Mujadara, but to my surprise, he happily gobbled it up and wanted seconds – the true test.

The basic recipe is easy and quick and feel free to add any seasonal veggies. Tomotoes are delicious in summer, but roasted root veggies or winter squash would be nice in winter.

The shallots are a must – so don’t leave them off.

I added pine nuts but feel free to leave them out or sub other nuts or seeds.  A little crunchy texture is nice.

Instant Pot Mujadara - a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Middle Eastern spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. #mujadara #healthy #lentils #rice #instantpot #instapot #mujadararecipe

This can be made ahead and reheated for easy healthy midweek meals. A healthy delicious base. To keep this vegan, top with tahini sauce instead of yogurt. Or add avocado!

Instant Pot Mujadara - a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Moroccan spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. #mujadara #healthy #lentils #rice #instantpot #instapot #mujadararecipe

During the colder months, add seasonal roasted veggies, ( cauliflower, carrots, parsnips, butternut)  instead of tomatoes. You can also add shredded raw veggies like carrots, beets or cabbage.  So a warm base of lentils and rice, topped with cool, crunchy raw veggies. Add tahini sauce or yogurt or  zhoug yogurt! 

An energizing  healthy bowl!

Instant Pot Mujadara - a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Middle Eastern spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. #mujadara #healthy #lentils #rice #instantpot #instapot #mujadararecipe

 

Instant Pot Mujadara - a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Middle Eastern spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. #mujadara #healthy #lentils #rice #instantpot #instapot #mujadararecipe

The fresh herbs and olive oil really elevate the Mujadara , so don’t skip this step.

Instant Pot Mujadara - a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Middle Eastern spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. #mujadara #healthy #lentils #rice #instantpot #instapot #mujadararecipe

Moroccan -style Mujadara! A quick and easy vegan meal that can be made in a Instant Pot.  You will love this!

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Instant Pot Mujadara

Instant Pot Mujadara - a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Moroccan spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable.

Instant Pot Mujadara – a comforting, healthy vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Moroccan spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable.

  • Author: Sylvia Fountaine
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 4-6
  • Category: Main, vegetarian, vegan, gluten free, instant pot,
  • Method: instant pot
  • Cuisine: middle eastern

Ingredients

  • 1 cup brown lentils ( or green or black- not split lentils)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2-3 fat shallots, thinly sliced ( or 1 red onion)
  • 4 cloves garlic, rough chopped
  • 2 teaspoons  cumin
  • 2 teaspoons coriander
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon allspice
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric, optional
  • 1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried mint or parsley ( or use a tablespoon of fresh)
  • lemon zest from one small lemon
  • 3 ½ cups water (be accurate)
  • 1 cup brown basmati rice ( rinsed, or white basmati)

Garnishes: caramelized shallot or onion, diced tomato, diced avocado, sprouts or greens, sliced cucumber, pine nuts, drizzle of olive oil, yogurt,  vegan yogurt, zhoug yogurt (amazing),  lemon wedges, fresh parsley, aleppo chili flakes. (In winter, serve with roasted root veggies, shredded kale, carrots, or cabbage or beets!

Instructions

Place lentils in a bowl and cover with hot tap water (or boiling water), letting them soak until time to add to the instant pot.

Set Instant Pot to Saute function. Saute shallots  in the oil, 4-5 minutes, stirring constantly,  until tender and fragrant and slightly caramelized. Remove half, saving for the topping. Add the garlic and saute until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. Add all the spices, salt, lemon zest and water.   Stir. Drain the lentils and add them along with the rinsed rice to the instant pot.  Give a good stir.

Cover the instant pot and set to Normal Pressure, High for 14 minutes. Let naturally release for at least 10 minutes.

In the mean time, prep any garnishes you like.

To serve, gently fluff Mujadara with a fork (do not over mix, or it will get mushy ).  Divide among bowls, drizzle with olive oil, add tomatoes, avocado, caramelized shallots, sprouts, a spoonful of yogurt or zhoug yogurt, or tahini sauce – and fresh parsley or mint. Feel free to serve with other seasonal veggies ( roasted root veggies, shredded cabbage or carrots, etc).

Enjoy!

Notes

This can be made ahead and refrigerated, and used as a healthy base for mid-week lunches.

In fall, winter you could serve with roasted winter squash or root veggies.

Keywords: Mujadara, Mujadara recipe, instant pot mujadara, best mujadara recipe, pressure cooker mujadara, authentic Mujadara recipe, Mujadara vegan Mujadara rice, lebanese mujadara recipe, how to make mujadara, what is mujadara,

2Instant Pot Mujadara - a nourishing vegetarian meal of lentils and rice, with fragrant Middle Eastern spices, served with caramelized shallots, fresh veggies, pine nuts and optional yogurt. Gluten-free and Vegan adaptable. Fast and easy!

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When We Fled Oaxaca, Albondigas Made Us Feel at Home

Good food is worth a thousand words—sometimes more. In My Family Recipe, a writer shares the story of a single dish that’s meaningful to them and their loved ones. This week, in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, we follow a family’s journey from Mexico.


I remember the day I saw the house that was to be our restaurant for the first time. It was—is—a 200-year-old colonial house in downtown Oaxaca, a city in Southern Mexico. The sheer magnitude of the place—with several rooms arranged around a roofless inner courtyard that included a fountain and a century-old, knobby orange tree—was enough to leave a person in awe, let alone a six-year-old child. It seemed like a mansion to me, brimming with hiding spots. I didn’t know it then and, perhaps, it took losing it ten years later to realize that place was home, with everything that word entails.

Just a few days before my 16th birthday, in May 2006, the teachers’ union went on a state-wide strike. They settled with improvised tents in the central plaza, el Zócalo, and all over downtown Oaxaca, including our restaurant’s street. It wasn’t anything out of the ordinary. The teachers had been going on strikes that sent children in the public school system into an undesired vacation every year for a couple of decades. They still do it (it’s an effective strategy to get higher wages). Only, that particular year the Governor didn’t budge, and his attempt to remove the teachers forcibly just served to escalate the conflict.

Eventually more political discontents joined, and together they formed the Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca (APPO). This group soon appointed itself as ruling body and demanded the resignation of the Governor. Barricading the city, seizing and burning public buses and buildings, the APPO effectively took control of Oaxaca, all while wrecking its tourism-based economy. Of course, the Governor didn’t resign.

When We Fled Peru, My Mother Took "Green Noodles" With Her

When We Fled Peru, My Mother Took “Green Noodles” With Her
by Carlos C Olaechea

Searching for Home in Aunt Mariah’s Recipe Box

Searching for Home in Aunt Mariah’s Recipe Box
by EmilyNunn

By September, my family was bankrupt and the economic predictions were grim. It was expected—correctly as the future revealed—that it would take a decade for Oaxaca to recover. But families can’t wait ten years to feed their children.

There really wasn’t time to say goodbye. I was two weeks into my junior year of high school when my parents sat my sister and me down and announced that we were moving to the United States “next Wednesday.”

We had six days. Six days to say goodbye to friends and loved ones, six days to take inventory of our lives and select which dearest possessions could fit into a suitcase. But six days wasn’t enough time to say goodbye to the kitchen where my grandmother had taught me what ribbon stage meant for baking, or to the dining room where I’d spend the vast majority of my Christmases. It certainly wasn’t enough time to say goodbye to my father, who stayed behind to settle things and sell whatever he could.


Our new house in Santa Fe was quintessential New Mexico: adobe-style and just off a quiet dirt road. All I remember thinking was how brown everything was; different shades of brown, beige and terracotta, but brown nonetheless. I missed the encircling mountains and the colorful two-toned houses lining the streets of Oaxaca.

Photo by Julia Gartland

For our first dinner in the new house, my mom made a staple of Mexican home cooking, albóndigas, meatballs in a tomato sauce. Her tomato sauce is spiced with chipotles and the meatballs are laced with capers and Oaxacan oregano, which she had smuggled in her suitcase. There were rice and black beans on the side, along with a basket full of corn tortillas. The beans were not quite the same, and the tortillas were slightly grainier and sweeter than the ones back home, but it didn’t really matter. For a brief moment, as I cut an albóndiga into smaller pieces and placed them inside a tortilla with a spoonful of beans and took a bite, I felt a sense of normalcy. My mom had cooked for us, and it tasted like home.

I imagine cooking was therapeutic for her, because my mom cooked a lot that year. After a long day of being mocked for my broken English and laughing off ignorant and slightly racist questions (“Do you have cars in Mexico?” to which I responded, “No, we all just ride donkeys everywhere”), it was comforting to come home and sit at the dinner table to eat with my family as I always had. We often Skyped Dad and ate “together.” Our shared meals grounded us, they made us feel like we belonged somewhere, even if it was just at that dinner table. Together at least.


We bought a 1992 Toyota Camry from one of the kitchen cooks my mom worked with. And many kind people gave us their hand-me-downs so we could survive the harsh New Mexico winter we weren’t accustomed to. As the snow fell outside, my mom made mole coloradito—a deep red and smoky sauce that takes a couple of hours to make, as well as a few chiles and more smuggled oregano— because I had asked her for it. A little bite of Oaxaca in the middle of a Santa Fe winter.

Oaxacan Cinnamon Chocolate Macarons

Oaxacan Cinnamon Chocolate Macarons
by robinbeth

Lentejas (Mexican Lentil Stew)

Lentejas (Mexican Lentil Stew)
by Emily | Cinnamon&Citrus

I can only be certain of how I was feeling and what I was thinking during those days, but I can imagine everyone in my family felt very much like I did. Months had passed and we had all become American citizens by then, but our new reality hadn’t quite sunk in.

I would often sit in my room for hours, looking through old photos, and I would close my eyes and imagine myself walking down the restaurant corridors. I thought of the summer days when I helped my mom, measuring the ingredients for mole negro or placing hibiscus flowers in a large bowl. I thought about my grandma, who would hide Kinder eggs (yes, the ones that are banned in America) around the courtyard for Easter. It felt that if I just imagined hard enough, long enough, I would transport myself back to Oaxaca.

“Dinner’s ready (ya está la cena),” my mom would call. I would put away the old photos and leave my room, and sit at the dinner table to eat tinga verde; milanesas; mole amarillo; albóndigas. That was home.

Almost six years after moving to the United States, my dad planted a small orange tree near the entrance of their new restaurant. It turned out to be a lemon tree instead. But as with the not-quite-the-same beans and tortillas from that first dinner, it didn’t matter. In a way, it was almost perfect. The original orange tree never gave oranges either.

Serves 8

  • 3.3

    pounds Roma tomatoes, halved

  • 2

    pieces garlic cloves

  • 1/2

    piece white onion

  • 1

    tablespoon dried Oaxacan oregano

  • 2

    pieces cloves

  • 3

    pieces black peppercorns

  • 2

    pieces canned chipotle chiles

  • 3

    tablespoons vegetable oil

  • 1.1

    pounds ground beef

  • 1.1

    pounds ground pork

  • 1

    piece egg

  • 1

    piece stale bread

  • 1/2

    cup water

  • 12

    pieces capers, chopped

  • 1

    pinch salt and pepper, to taste

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