Tag: Design

What Would Xocas Do? Joe Sacaridiz Cookie Recipe

What Would Xocas Do? Joe Sacaridiz Cookie Recipe



In the What Would Xocas Do segment of class, we gave Joe Sacaridiz’s cookie recipe a makeover. He was the first one to complete the assignment and his graphic had the right elements. (School of Visual Arts: Information Design CE)


Pie Crust Design, These Pie Crust Masters Show you How it’s Done

There’s an art to creating a beautiful pie crust, and it doesn’t have to be intimidating. If you’re looking to move beyond a simple, basic crust this season, there are a host of next-level pie crust design techniques out there to inspire your creations. There’s really no reason you can’t master the basket weave, the leafy border, or the fluted edge! Have fun with these.
Pie Crust Design, These Pie Crust Masters Show you How it's Done

1. Pie Crusts Classics

Thomas Joseph shows us a nice range of pie crust design options – a leaf border, a braid border, a honeycomb top (a favorite!), a classic lattice top crust, and he makes it all look easy and doable. Listen up for some of his helpful little tips as well like, how to hide seams.

2. Harvest Leaf Pie Crusts

A really pretty video demonstrating a range of beautiful harvest leaf pie designs. There’s the a mega-leaf pie (cool & unusual!), and a couple of free-style approaches with medium leaves. They all bake up beautifully!

3. Twenty Pie Crimping Techniques

Watch this one for the corkscrew crust, and Caesar’s crown. Measuring spoon is brilliant as well, but I have to admit visibly flinching at the pearl crust ;)…

4. Cookie Cutter Crusts

There is so much that could be said about this video, so many questions I have! 😉 I like the way our Topless Baker friend uses little fondant/cookie cutter flowers to accent his pie, and he really goes for it. Double decker flowers and all! That part kicks in around the 5:15 minute mark – I’ll tee it up for you.

5. Hearts, Flowers, & Polka-dots

There’s a nice graphic sensibility to this collection of crusts. And, the lace technique is new to me. I really love how the ribbon-edged crust baked up – super inspiring! Trying to find the original source video for this one and will update the link when I do.

6. Nine Minutes of Pie Inspiration

There are some very strange pies in this one. But, perhaps there will be something in the mix here that will inspire your own creations in the coming months.

7. Savory Square Basketweave

I sort of love this square basket weave with the sesame sprinkle. For when your basketweave game is strong.

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Food Democracy: Critical Lessons in Food, Communication, Design and Art

Food Democracy: Critical Lessons in Food, Communication, Design and Art



Food Democracy, by Oliver Vodeb is the first book that looks at how we can participate in and change the current broken food system through the use of socially responsive communication, design and art. The food system—production, distribution, consumption and representation—is broken because it is hijacked by corporations, which use it as a machine for profit, instead of supporting life. Socially responsive communication design and art works towards establishing a culture of dialogue to empower people in order to create a more democratic food system.

The book includes ground-breaking writing from leading international scholars, artists and activists, along with visual and written examples for practical alternatives to the dominant corporate forms of the current food system from around the world curated by the Memefest Festival. Food Democracy opens with questions like: How is advertising selling food as drugs? How can food design make us think? Why do we throw away some 40% of perfectly good fruit and vegetables at harvest? What role does pleasure play in experiencing food? Why are there fewer and fewer shops, but more and more restaurants and bars in our cities? Why is being a cook sexier than being a manager and which trends are shaping today’s food industry?

The beautifully designed book also includes for the first time a unique and delicious compilation of socially engaged recipes by the academic, artist and activist community. Special recipes for Burek the Great, Sardinian Magic, Crocodile Skewers, Slovenian Potica, Catalan Calçotada, a transcendental desert and a recipe for how to make an omelette and sabotage infrastructure will blow your mind and delight your palate.
You can buy it here:
https://www.amazon.com/Food-Democracy-Critical-Lessons-Communication/dp/1783207965/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1503811528&sr=8-1&keywords=Food+Democracy
or here
https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/books/view-Book,id=5269/


Room Recipes: Entryway

Room Recipes: Entryway



Read the full post here:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/room-recipe-entryway-glidden-paint-220883


Room Recipes: Dining Room

Room Recipes: Dining Room



Read the full post here:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/room-recipe-dining-room-glidden-paint-220884


We Relaunched An Original 1960s Dansk Dishware Design.

Photo by Ad Courtesy of Dansk

This is an ad for dishes. And yet, somehow, it reminds you of a scent. Freshly clipped grass, maybe. That and just-bleached whites billowing on the laundry line. (Let’s have a moment of silent appreciation for the days of thinly sliced hard boiled egg props and discoteque font.) But back to this memory: you’ve been outside all day building forts. Well, spacecraft to be precise, made with wood and blankets held together with household objects you didn’t get permission to borrow. You have dirt under your nails. You’re so hungry you can’t remember what food tastes like. You’ve been nosing into the kitchen every ten minutes asking when dinner would be ready only to be booted out. And then suddenly, just when you thought you would die of starvation, you hear a call from the window. The call comes out on the wings of the sweetest smells in the universe: Cream of chicken soup. Paprika. Golden onion crisps left just two minutes too long under the broiler. You run inside. You don’t even take off your shoes. Because there, on the table before you is a Dansk pan, still bubbling, sending up great curlicues of steam.

Tuck in your napkin first.
Tuck in your napkin first.
Photo by Ty Mecham & Rocky Luten

Maybe this is why so many of us find ourselves digging around flea markets and earnestly scouring ebay. We’re looking for that deep blue casserole pan our mother sold at a yard sale decades ago, aren’t we? (We were too young to know it was a Danish icon—one we’d covet for our tables later.)

With a strong Scandinavian minimalist structure (and a songbird-egg-like speckle) Dansk Generations evokes a time where canned yams were a novelty and everything tasted better with pineapple rings on top. But few people know how the line all got started. In the late 1950s, Neils Refsgaard was just out of college and bent on being a studio potter. He built his own kiln from the wreckage of a demolished one. He did it all by hand. And in the very same wood-burning beast, not long after, he collaborated with Dansk to make the line you see today. The casserole pans, roasters, and bowls started humbly, globbily taking shape on his wheel in a quiet workshop in Denmark. As time passed, Neils stuck to low-technology methods—the ones he’d picked up as a student at Kunsthåndværkerskolen i København (the School for Arts and Crafts). To stay as involved as possible during collaborations he often set up camp next door to factories where his designs were being produced—for weeks. Often, months. And sometimes years.

Still overseen by the man, the myth, and the legend, Neils himself.
Still overseen by the man, the myth, and the legend, Neils himself.
Photo by Ty Mecham & Rocky Luten

Which brings us back to the ad. It says that promises to redefine china, that “delicate eggshell stuff you could see a candle through.” Together with Neil’s pottery wheel, Dansk was offering a line of dishware that celebrated flaws as a sign of hand-crafted-ness. And the name? They call it Generations because they had it feeling it might start something—safe to say it did.

Over half a century later, Neils is still making his rounds in the Dansk factory, now for the exclusive relaunch of the Generations line. That childhood casserole scene? Maybe you could reenact that this Wednesday. With all the oven-to-table charm of the 1960s the line is back in a dusky blue and an exclusive-to-Food52 speckle. Now, instead of haggling and bidding, you can start looking at roast recipes (how bout this one for starters?) and you can tell your dinner guests you’re serving it from a dish made by the original Danish designer

Have a favorite Dansk (or vintage dishwater) memory? Please tell us about it in the comments below!

Tags:
Cookware

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